Ready to become digital?

A new exhibition explores ways in which we might view ourselves and others as digital beings.

The collection of works pose such intriguing questions like: how to we feel about seeing ourselves on screen; how would it feel to live more of our lives in virtual bodies, and how would it feel to let machines take more control over our real bodies?

The Robots and Avatars exhibition explores how people will work and play with new representational forms of themselves and others in virtual and physical life in the next 10 to 15 years. Spencer Kelly went to the exhibition to get a vision of this future.

The Robots and Avatars exhibition runs until 27 May 2012 at FACT, Liverpool and tours Romania, Slovenia, France and then the Asia Pacific region from 2012 to 2014.

If you would like to comment on this video or anything else you have seen on Future, head over to our Facebook page or message us on Twitter

Advertisements

Skype lands on PlayStation Vita

The PS Vita gained yet another powerful feature yesterday with the debut of an official Skype (video and voice) app.

You can download Skype for PlayStation Vita from the PlayStation Store for free. (Credit: Sony Computer Entertainment) Continue reading

Opera 12’s first beta also swan song for quirky features

The first beta of Opera 12 sees several new features take the stage as older browser options such as Unite and Widgets leave the scene.

Support for the HTML5 API getUserMedia allows sites to interact directly with hardware components, such as your Web cam.

Support for the HTML5 API getUserMedia allows sites to interact directly with hardware components, such as your Web cam. (Credit: Opera) Continue reading

Does the internet rewire your brain?

 

 

 

 

 

Being online does change your brain, but so does making a cup of tea. A better question to ask is what parts of the brain are regular internet users using.

This modern age has brought with it a new set of worries. As well as watching our weight and worrying about our souls, we now have to worry about our brain fitness too – if you believe the headlines. Is instant messaging eroding the attention centres of our brains?
Are Facebook, Twitter and other social media tools preventing you from forming normal human bonds? And don’t forget email – apparently it releases the same addictive neurochemicals as crack cocaine! Continue reading

Google Drive Here! Google Drive for Android Too! Technology News 2012

The long awaited Google Drive is finally here! Is Dropbox and Box.com sweating buckets now?

“Keep Everything. Share Everything.”
That’s Google Drive’s slogan.

So what does it do? Continue reading

To Pin, or Not to Pin: Joining the Pinterest Phenomenon

The concept of Pinterest is easy to grasp; it works as a social pin board where you share your pictures with the masses. An simple concept that is scarily effective. Far from just another photo/video sharing website, Pinterest is growing in popularity as the hottest new social network; currently sitting at #5 on Hitwise’s list of the top 10 social networks in the US- ahead of LinkedIn and Google+ – and in the past few months, more and more people are commenting on how to capatalise on this new social phenomenon.

According to ComScore, Pinterest attracted 17.8 million visitors by the month of March; an increase of 50% from the previous month. The site has become one of the fastest growing sites in Web history and has become a real contender in the social realm. And as with any new social network that sprouts, marketers wonder; “how can I use it for marketing?”

So what Opportunities are Out There for Marketers? Continue reading

Android, Java, and the tech behind Oracle v. Google

Wondering what the lawyers and programmers are talking about in the highest-profile tech trial in years? Here’s a guide to the ties between Android and Java — and the history leading up to the case.

The eyeless, mouthless Java mascot named Duke cartwheels across a T-shirt from a JavaOne conference.

The eyeless, mouthless Java mascot named Duke cartwheels across a T-shirt from a JavaOne conference. (Credit: Stephen Shankland/CNET) Continue reading